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2006-2013 Chevrolet Impala

Upgrading the stereo system in your Impala
2006 • 2007 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 • 2013

Chevrolet Impala SS

In brief: This Crutchfield Research Garage article gives you an overview of your Impala's stock stereo system and your aftermarket upgrade options. Use our vehicle selector to find the gear that will fit your Chevy. 

Overview of the Chevy Impala

You know this car. You've seen it on the road, you've seen it at the mall, and you've seen it in the rental lot at the airport. You may have even seen it in your rear-view mirror, blue lights a-flashing, the last time you got caught driving with, ummmm, "excessive enthusiasm." What we're trying to say is that Chevy sold a ton of these cars over the years.

Considering its stylish looks, roomy interior and decent road manners, we're not a bit surprised. In its basic form, the Impala is a solid family car. If you can find one equipped with the high-performance SS package, you'll have an Impala that's impressively fast and almost totally invisible. No matter what you're starting with, your Impala will be an even better ride once you add a better audio system.

Chevy Impala factory radio

The Impala's factory radio (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Factory stereo system

The 2006-2012 Chevrolet Impala was offered with a choice of two factory stereo systems:

  • The standard system, with an AM/FM/CD/MP3 receiver and six speakers
  • An optional Bose® system, with all of the above, plus two more speakers

Both of these systems offer about what you'd expect from a factory-installed stereo package. If you're reading this, you're probably a person who expects a lot more from a car stereo.

The healthy amount of available in-dash space ensures that you'll have a wide range of aftermarket single-DIN (2" tall) or double-DIN (4" tall) receivers to choose from.

Chevy Impala radio cavity

With the factory unit removed, there's plenty of space for your new receiver. (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Replacing your factory radio

While today's Impala is much smaller than the leviathan machines that wore the nameplate back in the 1970's, it's not exactly a Geo Metro. It's still a good-sized car and there's plenty of room to work when you're installing a new radio.

Removing the Impala's factory system isn't terribly difficult, but it requires some skill and a reasonable amount of patience--especially when prying off the trim piece that surrounds the unit. The combination of the hard plastic trim and the softer plastic dash material can make the job seem easier than it actually is. Don't be fooled. And don't be too hasty. Use a clean panel tool (to prevent dash stains and scratches) and pry the trim off slowly (to avoid breaking the plastic) until the retaining clips release.

Metra GMOS-LAN-01 GM Factory Integration Adapter

The GMOS-LAN-01 adapter is a great solution for many Impalas

Pull out the trim panel, disconnect the wiring harness, and remove the panel. Then, remove the two Phillips screws that hold the climate control unit in place. Feel free to let that unit dangle while you undo the four Phillips screws securing the radio. Pull it out, unhook the harness, and put it aside.

It's important to note that the warning chimes and audible turn signals are built into the factory radio unit. Whether you have the standard system or the Bose system, you'll need to purchase an adapter to retain the warning chimes – even if you don't use OnStar. The adapter will keep the audible safety warnings functioning properly, while also providing a switched 12-volt power source for your new radio. Depending on the adapter, it might even integrate the steering wheel audio controls.

Crutchfield strongly recommends that you use one of these adapters when you replace the factory radio. The specific adapter that's right for your car depends on the car's model year  whether or not it has a Bose system, but you'll definitely need one. We'll give you a deep discount on the adapter's price when you purchase it along with your new stereo.

The GMOS-LAN-01 GM factory integration adapter (above right), for example, retains the factory warning chimes, OnStar® capability, and the Bose amp, if present.

Your new system from Crutchfield also qualifies for discounts on a mounting kit to trim out the new radio and an adapter that connects the Impala's stock antenna to your new radio. You'll also get our free step-by-step installation instructions. 

Tools required: Phillips screwdriver, panel tool

Detailed stereo and speaker removal instructions

MasterSheet image
With step-by-step disassembly instructions and plenty of up-close, detailed photos, our exclusive Crutchfield MasterSheet™ takes the guesswork out of removing the factory stereo and speakers. It's free with your Crutchfield order, or you can purchase one separately for just $9.99.

Steering wheel audio controls

It's relatively easy to retain your Impala's steering wheel audio controls when you install a new stereo. When you enter your vehicle information, our database will choose the adapter you need to make your factory steering wheel controls work with your new receiver. We'll discount this adapter, too, when you buy it with a new receiver.

Shop for car stereos that fit your Chevrolet Impala
Chevy Impala front door speakers

Replacing the front door speakers can be a bit challenging  (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Replacing your factory speakers

Replacing the factory stereo system in your 2006-2012 Impala is a relatively straightforward process. Replacing the speakers, however, is not. You can do the job yourself, but you'll need a fair amount of time, tools, and patience.

Chevy Impala front door speaker

A close-up of a front door speaker (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Front door speakers

The Impala's front door speaker area can accommodate 5-1/4", 6-1/2", or even 6-3/4" speakers, but mounting depth is limited to 2.9" and this is not a simple, "plug and play" job.

First, the door panel must be removed to access the speakers. This process starts by removing the sail panel and continues through several more steps involving hidden star screws camouflaged (rather cleverly, we must say) by plastic trim pieces. You'll need Torx T30 and T15 bits to remove the screws. Take your time and be careful not to damage the plastic trim during the removal process.

Once you've removed the factory speakers, you'll need mounting brackets to fit the new speakers to the openings (these brackets are included free with your Crutchfield speaker purchase). mount the adapter bracket, and secure the speakers. The factory speaker grilles on the door panel will fit perfectly over your new speakers.

Unfortunately, there isn't a wiring harness available for the speakers, so you’ll have to cut the factory speaker wire and splice in. Our Crutchfield MasterSheet contains detailed wiring instructions that will make the job easier.

Tools needed: Panel tool, small flat blade, Torx T30 and T15 star bits, 7mm ratchet and extension, wire cutters

Chevy Impala tweeter location

The tweeters are located at the base of the Impala's "A" pillar. They're hard to reach and harder to replace. (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Front tweeters

The factory tweeters are located in the windshield "A" pillars. This is an admirably slick bit of design, but the GM styling studio clearly wasn't thinking about potential aftermarket upgrades when they came up with this idea. The size and location of the tweeters (the pillar space is a mere 0.8 inches deep) makes it very hard to replace them, much less upgrade them. Tweeter depth is the real issue here, so your shopping choices are somewhat limited.

The wiring harness is located deep in the dash, so you'll need to cut off the factory connectors and splice the vehicle's speaker wires to your new speaker wires. You'll also need to fabricate a mounting bracket. In all honesty, this might be a job for a car stereo installation professional. To avoid all that hassle and expense, we suggest mounting aftermarket tweeters on the Impala's door panels. 

If you're interested in learning more, check out our informative article on tweeter placement.

Tools needed: Phillips screwdriver, panel tool, small flat blade, 7mm ratchet and extension, wire cutters. 

Chevy Impala rear deck speakers

The Impala's rear deck speakers. (Crutchfield Research Photo)

Rear deck speakers

Replacing the rear deck speakers is a relatively uncomplicated process – once you get to them. The toughest part or the job is removing the rear seat (top and bottom), the interior sail panels and the deck panel in order to access the speaker location. This is a very labor-intensive process. If you're going to do it yourself, we recommend that you clear out a full afternoon and some empty garage space.

A wide variety of 6" x 9", 5-1/4", or 6-1/2" speaker sets will fit the space nicely, plus the factory brackets and grilles work perfectly and a wiring harness is available.

Top mounting height is limited to 0.8 inches, but that still leaves plenty of great speakers to choose from. A speaker adapter bracket is required for the 5-1/4" or 6-1/2" speakers, and it's included free, along with the wiring harness, with your Crutchfield speaker order.

Chevy Impala rear deck tweeters

Bose-equipped Impalas feature rear deck tweeters (Crutchfield Research Photo)

If your car came equipped with a Bose system, you’ll also find a set of tweeters in the factory mounting bracket. There are a few 3-1/2" speakers that will fit in this space, but your options are severely limited by the rather tight 0.33 inches of mounting height.

The factory woofers receive only bass frequencies from the amplifier, so if you replace them, the aftermarket speakers will only reproduce bass.

Tools required: Panel tool, 7mm socket, 1/4" ratchet and extension. If your car has a fixed rear seat, you'll need a 10mm socket. If it has a folding rear seat, you'll need an 18mm socket.

Shop for speakers that fit your Chevrolet Impala

Bass in your Impala

If you're planning to add maximum bass to your Impala, there's plenty of room for a subwoofer box in the trunk. The available area for sub-box mounting is: Width (side to side) = 36", Height = 17",  Depth (front to rear) = 40" at bottom, 40" at top. There are currently no custom enclosures available for the Impala.

Shop for vehicle-specific subwoofers for your Chevrolet Impala

Accele RVCLPMBS rear-view camera

This license plate camera can really help with rear visibility

Other options for your Impala

There are plenty of other ways to improve your Impala. Here are some of the ways Crutchfield can help.

Rear-view camera

The Impala isn't as big as an SUV, but it's still a good-sized vehicle to wrestle with in a crowded parking lot. If you're looking for a way to improve your vision and safety, we offer rear-view cameras from Kenwood, Alpine, Sony, Pioneer, and more. Some are designed to work with same-brand receivers only, but others come with a composite video connector and will work with almost any video receiver.

Bluetooth and iPod connectivity

If you want to improve your Impala's convenience and connectivity, add an iPod adapter or integrated Bluetooth to the system using kits from Crutchfield. Please enter your vehicle information or call an Advisor at 1-888-955-6000 to find the kit that’s best for you.

Remote start and security systems

Adding remote start capability to your vehicle lets you warm it up in the winter or cool it down in the summer. The iDatastart system is incredibly convenient and makes it easier than ever to install a remote start system, so we highly recommend it. The module requires a vehicle-specific T-harness (sold separately) to connect with your vehicle's computer, security, and ignition systems, so we ask that you call to order so that we can make sure you get the right harness for your ride.

You can also talk to your Crutchfield Advisor about a security system. They’re not as easy to install (we usually suggest letting a professional do the job), but we can help you choose a system that’ll work in your vehicle.

Shop for car security systems for your Chevrolet Impala

Find the audio gear that fits your car or truck

Visit our Outfit My Car page and enter your vehicle information to see stereos, speakers, subs, and other audio accessories that will work in your vehicle.

  • Darrell Hobbs from Bradenton

    Posted on 4/12/2021

    this really helped a lot, thanks.

  • kipkirui hezron from Montrose

    Posted on 2/3/2021

    I have 2008 Chevy, I replaced my stereo and I connected LC -GMRC-LAN 01 harness to retain my chime function but my steering wheel functions are not working.

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 2/4/2021

    Kipkirui, With questions like that, it's always better to have a conversation with a real live human. If you bought your gear from Crutchfield, you can call Tech Support for free help troubleshooting your system.
  • Jason Edwards from Bangor

    Posted on 1/23/2021

    I have a 2007 impala (non-Bose system). I purchased everything for the install from Crutchfield. All wiring is connected properly and running through the interface. Volume is very weak at Max level. Suggestions?

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 1/25/2021

    Jason, With questions like that, it's always better to have a conversation with a real live human. If you bought your gear from Crutchfield, you can call Tech Support for free help troubleshooting your system.
  • EF from DFW

    Posted on 1/15/2021

    what is impedance of each speaker? thinking upgrades i purchase from crutchfield would want to use same resistance when keeping factory head unit and amp. thanks!

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 1/15/2021

    EF, When you enter your vehicle's info into our Outfit My Car tool, you'll see which speakers fit your car. If you have any questions, our advisors are available via phone or chat.
  • Karen Cole from Owenton

    Posted on 12/1/2020

    I just bought a 2013 Impala ltz, put my 1st cd in, and now it will be Christmas all year long if I can't replace the current stereo. I prefer one that can hold multiple cds like the nice Bose in my 2007 Chevy Trailblazer LS. Any recommendations?

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 12/1/2020

    Karen, Multi-disc receivers are hard to find these days, but there are plenty of other great receivers that will work in your Impala. We'll help you find something that'll sound great and definitely allow you to eject CDs when you want to! I've sent your question to our sales team, and they'll be contacting you via email soon. For immediate help, you can contact them via phone or chat.
  • djaye from elkton md

    Posted on 9/17/2020

    I have a 2006 ltz with Bose. I want to bypass the factory amplifier and install a new double din headunit, along with a new amp what is needed (a line out converter? Which PAC will work

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 9/18/2020

    Djaye, I've sent your question to our sales team, and they'll be contacting you via email soon. For immediate help, you can contact them via phone or chat.
  • Matt from Rancho Cucamonga

    Posted on 8/13/2020

    We have the non Bose system, (UW6) tweeters in the window frames, mids in the doors ,and woofers in the trunk. Does the system already have crossovers, are the speakers frequency limited from the system? Ie Will it be a waste of time putting 3 ways in the doorst(or else where) because it's only mid range from factory system?

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 8/13/2020

    Matt, With questions like that, it's always better to have a conversation with a real live human. Give us a call and talk to one of our advisors. We can help you choose the right gear and give you the right advice on how to install it.
  • Ardanies D Smith from Dayton

    Posted on 8/1/2020

    I have a 06 Chevy impala with the bose system. I've already replaced the factory ready and used the pac wire harness to retain all factory functions. The issue that im having is my amp cutting in and out, I'm not sure what the issue is. I thought about going to junkyard and picking another one up and replacing it. But wanted to see if there's a bypass harness instead that easy to install. I plan on replacing all speakers and amp at a later date as I build my system. Just want a easy fix for now. Would like your recommendation and advice

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 8/3/2020

    Ardanies, If you bought your gear from Crutchfield, you can call Tech Support for free help troubleshooting your system. If you purchased your equipment elsewhere, you can still get expert Crutchfield Tech Support - 90 days-worth for only $30. Check out our tech support page for details.
  • Johnny Cedeno from Bayonne nj

    Posted on 6/27/2020

    I have a 2009 chevy impala police Interceptor i put in a new radio Double din and i notice that when i shut the car off its stays on and kills my battery would the gmos-lan-01 help with that issue ? I feel like everyone i speak to about this doesnt really know y But please any help will be perfect

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 6/29/2020

    Johnny, It's almost definitely a wiring issue. I've sent your question to our sales team, and they'll be contacting you via email soon. For immediate help, you can contact them via phone or chat.
  • Andrew from Niagara Falls

    Posted on 4/27/2020

    I'm looking to replace the amplifier. The head unit is so integrated with climate control, the camera, and safety pings that I'd rather not change it. It's also pretty functional and fits the car's aesthetics, so I plan to leave it. Thing is, Chevy's factory EQ doesn't do it for me and I want to cut through that by bypassing the factory amp. Some places suggest buying $200-500 bypass loops for this thing. Why not just place a new amp back there and run the audio through it? Do Onstar and alert pings really go through the AMP instead of the head unit and center console for some reason?

    Commenter image

    Jon Paul from Crutchfield

    on 4/29/2020

    Andrew, With questions like these, it's always better to have a conversation with a real live human. Give us a call and talk to one of our advisors. We can help you choose the right gear and give you the right advice on how to install it.